Today's News
ELAL 800×100
Peerles 800×100
S&P 600×100
Community Sports 800×100
Shlomo Artzi 800×100
Israel Bond RRSP Jan 2017
S&P 600×100
ELAL 600×100
Shlomo
Toronto City Hall. Photo: CIJnews

New Toronto Planning Review Panel reflects diverse voices

Daniel Fusca, Chair of the Toronto Planning Review Panel at the Office of the Chief Planner of the City of Toronto, said that “a disproportionate number of the people we engage in city planning processes tend to be white, male, homeowners, and over the age of 55.”

The Panel decided to end the white dominance by inviting more diverse voices. Fusca explained the new policy as follows:

Both the Toronto Planning Review Panel and the new Youth Engagement Strategy, completed in late 2015, are important steps we’re taking to better engage Toronto’s diverse communities in the planning process.

“For the Planning Review Panel, we took a concept developed and popularized by our partners at MASS LBP —the Citizen Reference Panel selected at random through Civic Lottery— and extended it for a new purpose. Instead of asking residents to volunteer a month or two of their time to provide input on a singular issue, we asked Torontonians to volunteer for two years (16 total Saturdays), to provide input into a variety of planning issues of citywide importance.

“As far as we know, this is a world’s first, and we’re extremely excited to see how it works out. So far, so good: the 28 members of Toronto’s inaugural Planning Review Panel are smart, sophisticated people who bring an incredible diversity of experience and perspective to the table.”

The Employment Equity Act defines visible minorities as ‘persons, other than Aboriginal peoples, who are non-Caucasian in race or non-white in colour.’ Categories in the Visible minority variable include South Asian, Chinese, Black, Filipino, Latin American, Arab, Southeast Asian, West Asian, Korean, Japanese.

The new Toronto Planning Review Panel is comprised of 28 members, of whom same number (14) of men and women, 14 (50%) fall under the category of visible minorities, 12 (42.8%) are white, 1 (3.6%) First Nations and 1 (3.6%) Métis. 7 members (25%) have Muslim/ Arab names reflecting the increasing number of newcomers from the Muslim/ Arab countries who resettled in Toronto. For more information click HERE and HERE.

Name

Age Group

Residence

Origin

1

Mohamed Abdo 45 – 64 Toronto & East York District

2

Jihan Abrahim 18 – 29 Etobicoke York District

3

Al Eslami 45 – 64 North York District Iran

4

Dordana Hakimzadah 30 – 44 Scarborough District Kandahar, Afghanistan

5

Rahim Lalani 30 – 44 Toronto and East York District Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

6

Adnan Zabian 30 – 44 Etobicoke York District Toronto

7

Solomon Mohamed 45 – 64 Toronto & East York District Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

8

BJ Bejaimal 45 – 64 Etobicoke York District Guyana

9

Shajeentha Sabaratnam 18 – 29 Scarborough District

Sri Lanka

10

Neer Singh 45 – 64 North York District Guyana

11

Sunita Botha 45 – 64 Scarborough District Trinidad

12

Joyce Chan 30 – 44 North York District

13

Jason Wong 18 – 29 Scarborough District Hong Kong

14

Adam Zhang 18 – 29 North York District

15

Judy Tran 18 – 29 Etobicoke York District Toronto

16

Ivorine Phillips 45 – 64 Etobicoke York District Jamaica

17

Peta-Gaye Ebanks 30 – 44 Toronto and East York District

First Nations

18

Delaney Waddell 45 – 64 North York District

Toronto, Métis

19

Susan Delavigne 65 Scarborough District

20

Albert Dowell 65 Etobicoke York District

21

Simone Hodgson 18 – 29 Toronto & East York District

Toronto

22

Emily Johnston 18 – 29 North York District

Toronto

23

Sharon Kemp 65 Scarborough District

Toronto

24

Steve Michailidis 18 – 29 Toronto & East York District Oshawa

25

Irv Rayman 65 North York District

Toronto

26

Mark Richardson 30 – 44 Toronto & East York District UK

27

Jeannette Thornton S65+carborough District Grand Falls, New Brunswick

28

Stan Tomas 30 – 44 Etobicoke York District Toronto

See also: Anti white headline on Toronto Metro front page (click HERE)

ELAL 600×100
Buzaker 600×100
S&P 600×100
Israel Bond RRSP Jan 2017

About Jonathan D. Halevi

Jonathan D. Halevi
Lt. Col. (ret.) Jonathan D. Halevi is co-founder and editor of CIJnews and a senior researcher of the Middle East and radical Islam at the Jerusalem Center for Public Affairs. He is also a co-founder of the Orient Research Group Ltd.

Send this to friend